Joel Garten: The Artist In The Studio

Here are some photos of me working in the studio. I use a lot of different mediums, oil pastel, oil paint, oil stick and acrylic. Sometimes I use them all in one piece! I work very intuitively and I really like using my hands to do handpainting or fingerpainting. My work is expressive, and are influenced by my work as a composer and by Abstract Expressionism and Jean-Michel Basquiat. Photos by Bill Kobzey.

Visit my website to see more image www.joelgarten.com

 

Artworks on the floor of the studio

Artworks on the floor of the studio

Joel painting with his hand

Joel painting with his hand

Acrylic on paper painting

Acrylic on paper painting

mixed media on paper artwork by emerging artist Joel Garten

mixed media on paper artwork by emerging artist Joel Garten

Artist at work in the studio

Artist at work in the studio

Working oil pastel on paper

Working oil pastel on paper

closeup of the artist at work

closeup of the artist at work

Toronto Emerging Artist

I am an emerging artist from Toronto, Canada.  My artwork is intense and filled with energy.  I work mainly in mixed media on paper. Along with being an emerging artist, I am also a composer and writer.  My artwork is inspired by the flow of music and rhythm, and as an artist I have many influences, from abstract expressionism to Asian textiles.  My studio is in downtown Toronto. – Joel Garten 

Untitled” by Joel Garten

 

Untitled” by Joel Garten

Untitled” by Joel Garten

joel garten art

Untitled” by Joel Garten

 

 

 

 

 

Sassetta, The Journey of the Magi

Sassetta was a Sienese painter, one of my favorites painters of the renaissance.  This painting is in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and I visit it whenever I am there.  The composition of this painting is very mysterious, with the monkey, the stork and the central figure. Sassetta’s landscapes are always really barren and strangely beautiful.

sassetta

Sassanian King

Sassanian King

This is a magnificent work of art, a portrait in silver of a Sassanian King, that resides in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.  It is a little smaller than life size. The Sassanians were the rulers of ancient Iran, and had a taste for amazing works in silver.  The Kings were differentiated by each having a different and interesting crown.

Artist and Composer Joel Garten announces his new painting series entitled “Permanent Crimson”

Artist and Composer Joel Garten announces his new painting series entitled “Permanent Crimson”

Emerging Artist

Two works by Joel Garten in the Permanent Crimson series.  Joel Garten’s new series of works prominently feature intense reds, saturated crimson colors and warm pinks.

Toronto emerging art

“Permanent Crimson III” by Joel Garten, 36×48 inches, mixed media on canvas

Joel Garten is now in the process of creating a new series of works entitled “Permanent Crimson” based on the deep burnt red color of the same name.  His new series of works on canvas are large scale and have a bold expressionist style, remaining true to Garten’s influence from Jean-Michel Basquiat and Abstract Expressionism.

Garten, who is also a composer, improviser and pianist, utilizes a gestural intuitive process to create his artworks.  They are imbued with an intensity and energy which shares a common origin with his intense, passionate piano improvisations which he has honed over two decades.

He believes in following a sense of flow in artistic creation.  “Whatever I create, be it art or music or even my whole life, I feel a sense of flow – of one thing progressing to the next naturally and intuitively, guided occasionally by conscious intervention.”

He has become entranced by the possibilities of using deep, intense red and pink colors in this new series, from ruby reds to light pinks. “I started to use a new acrylic paint which is very liquid and allows a lot of manipulation in a finger or hand painting technique.  It is a very expressive medium.  I knew I needed to pair down my chromatic range to concentrate more on the compositional elements of the paintings, to feel more of the feeling of the line, to let it really express itself. Therefore I have focused on this set of colors, ones that I find very beautiful and very expressive.”

Garten’s work is recognized for its energetic hand, and often draws comparison to Cy Twombly, though his works draws upon a multitude of artistic influences and inspiration. Garten has an encyclopaedic knowledge of art gained through obsessively visiting museums in more than 40 countries.

“I have a broad appreciation for art in many forms, from old master paintings to Islamic calligraphy to Balinese music to Burmese textiles.  The creative spirit runs through my whole life.”

Indeed, Garten lives what he describes as an artist’s life. “I follow that sense of flow through my everyday life, one that is filled with creative potential, but that remains a two edged sword – sometimes I can be overwhelmed by my own thoughts and dreams.”

Joel Garten’s art and music can be viewed and listened to on his website, www.JoelGarten.com.  He is based in Toronto but also has a presence in New York City.  He is currently planning an exhibition of his “Permanent Crimson” works as well as working on a new CD of piano improvisations.

 

Abstraction artwork

“Permanent Crimson IV” by Joel Garten, 36×48 inches, mixed media on canvas

Art in Toronto
“Permanent Crimson VI” by Joel Garten, 36×48 inches, mixed media on canvas

Joel Garten, photo of the artist
Joel Garten

Painting Toronto
“Permanent Crimson VIII” by Joel Garten, 36×48 inches, mixed media on canvas

View of Budapest across the Danube

I took this photo of Budapest around sunset, the sun illuminating this beautiful city.  The Danube river is the heart of the Budapest, the liquid highway that brought it wealth and a cosompolitan connection to the outside world.  It also linked the city with Vienna, this city with which Hungary was soldered at the hip to during the reign of the Austro-Hungarian Empire.

Hungary was not a great nation that created impressive monuments or extensive landholdings. Rather it was a nation that had an intense wealth of folk culture, demonstrated in a kaleidoscopic range of folk costumes and handicrafts, strange pentatonal songs and a zest for the countryside.

The true shining accomplishment of the Hungarians reached its apogee in the creation of much of modern physics and mathematics in the 20th century.